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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Please do not plagiarize. If you would like to use this information in a print or electronic publication, please ask me for permission first and cite this page as:
Knapp, Robbin D. 2009. "Swahili English: S". In Robb: Swahili English. Jan. 6, 2009.

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S
safari n.
from safari "journey, voyage, expedition; caravan, company of persons travelling together, equipped party or expedition": an expedition or journey, often on foot, as for hunting, especially in eastern Africa; any long or adventurous expedition; the caravan of such an expedition [< Swahili < Arabic safari, safariy "pertaining to a journey", safara "to travel"].
  • "The young man casually mentioned that he always took Bannerman's own work on West African birds with him on safari. 'Not all eight volumes?!' exclaimed Bannerman; to which the gentleman casually replied: 'It only means another porter!'" Stephen Moss, A Bird in the Bush: A Social History of Birdwatching, 2004, p. 136.
  • safari"He had friends who were into extreme vacations – backpackers and whitewater rafters, gorilla trekkers, safari types always trying to outdo the rest with tales of near-death experiences on the other side of the world." John Grisham, The Testament, 1999, p. 117.
  • "So I called my travel agent and said I wanted to climb Kilimanjaro, and the agent said no problem; she'd set it up to follow the safari; we should remember to pack boots and a parka, and that was that." Michael Crichton, Travels, 1988, p. 167.
  • "Yet another safari tourist met with an early demise when she left the safety of the tour bus, in the face of numerous explicit warnings, in order to frame a better picture." Wendy Northcutt, The Darwin Awards II, 2001, p. 30.
  • "No boat had left the harbor in the meantime -- there was not a railroad within hundreds of miles -- there was no other white settlement that the two could reach under several days of arduous marching accompanied by a well-equipped safari." Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Son of Tarzan, 1915, p. 31. Safari is used 22 times in this book.
  • "The war was not a safari." Wayne Karlin, Le Minh and Truong Vu, The Other Side of Heaven: Postwar Fiction by Vietnamese and American Writers, 1995.
  • "Green women's perfumes include Vent Vert, Chanel No. 19, Alfred Sung, and Safari." Edwin L. Morris, Scents of Time: Perfume from Ancient Egypt to the 21st Century, 2000.
  • More books and products related to safari
SarabiNew!Sarabi n.
from sarabi "mirage": the name of a particular lion in Disney's Lion King [< Swahili < Arabic].
  • "Mufasa, the Lion King (Samuel E. Wright); the grown-up hero, Simba (Jason Raize); and Simba's mother, Sarabi (Gina Breedlove) wear their masks above their heads, somewhat like bishops' miters." Michael Tueth, "The Lion King (review)", America, Jan. 17, 1998.
shauri, shauria n.
from shauri "discussion, debate": trouble, a row or fracas [< Swahili < Arabic].
ShenziNew!shenzi adj., n.
from -shenzi "barbarous, uncivilized, uncouth": a pejorative designation for native Africans or their ways, language, etc.; the name of a particular hyena in Disney's Lion King [< Swahili < Persian].
  • "However, after having been in our employ a little while, and after having adopted the fez, jersey, and short trousers—and, as a matter of pure pride and symbolism, boots—they all regarded themselves as of an elevated social status, and openly looked down on the unregenerated 'shenzis' or natives who were still in the kirtle-of-banana-leaves cultural stage." Theodore Roosevelt, A Book-Loverís Holidays in the Open, 1916.
  • "To bolt for the safety of a tree is to beg the question completely, to brand himself as a shenzi forever; to fire a gun in any circumstances is to beg the question also, for the white man must be able to depend absolutely on his second gun in an emergency." Stewart Edward White, The Land of Footprints.
Simba n.
from simba "lion": name given to lions in stories [< Swahili].
Swahili n.
See Kiswahili.

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